LIFE

 

As a daughter of a track and field athlete and a canoeist Pauline Grabosch got in touch with elite sports at an early age. After breaking national records in her age bracket, she turned to cycling at the age of 12 where her extraordinary talent was discovered at an early stage.

In her first World Championships participation in 2015 she won two Gold Medals (team sprint and 500m time trial). Prior to that, Pauline had already been awarded two gold and two silver medals respectively in the Junior Track Cycling European Championship. In the following year she essentially dominated sprint disciplines by winning multiple World and European Championships as well as setting numerous world records across the board. With these accomplishments she was elected “Junior Female Athlete of the Year” which is the single highest accolade in Germany awardable to up-and-comers.

Her transition to elite level cycling with 19 year olds took place seamlessly. She won a world cup in Apeldoorn right of the bat, in addition to a Silver Medal in 500 m time trial in Paris.

SUCCESSES

 

2017: SILVER MEDAL EUROPEAN CHAMPIONSHIPS 500M TT

 

2017: SILVER MEDAL EUROPEAN CHAMPIONSHIPS TEAM SPRINT

 

2017: UNDER 23 EUROPEAN CHAMPION 500M TT

 

2016: SILVER MEDAL EUROPEAN CHAMPIONSHIPS 500M TT

 

2016: JUNIOR WORLD CHAMPION 500M TT

 

2016: JUNIOR WORLD CHAMPION SPRINT

 

2015: JUNIOR WORLD CHAMPION TEAMSPRINT

 

2015: JUNIOR WORLD CHAMPION 500M TT

 

Q&A

What fascinates you about track cycling?

Particularly in the sprint sections you get to ride very fast and the sensation when you take a curve is incredible. To feel the speed and to push your physical capabilities to the limit is what fascinates me the most.

What is your biggest dream for the future?

My biggest dream is actually to travel the world, which I started when I picked up cycling. I want to get to know different countries and people and enjoy my time because nobody can take away experiences and memories.

How can track cycling become mainstream in your opinion?

Unfortunately, only few sports are widely popular. German society needs to grow a liking for a wider spectrum of sports and the media would need to support that. Part of the problem is the lack of information about track cycling. Track cycling is not road cycling and vice versa. Children as well as parents have to be made enthusiastic for the sport as early as possible in order to facilitate a societal foundation for the sport to prosper.

What other career goal are you pursuing next to cycling?

I tend to separate my goals into two categories: professional goals and personal goals. For the moment I’m looking to reconcile my professional life with my private life. My dream is to win a medal at the Olympics and then to pursue a career I enjoy. Naturally I want start a family at some point and be able to look on at my past with satisfaction.

How do you relax best?

I relax best at my parents’ place. Just turning off your head and enjoying the fresh air of home.